Keon Family Law

Children with severe physical or mental disabilities may require lifetime care and financial support from others in order to survive as adults. Often, such children will continue to reside with and be dependent upon their parents throughout adulthood. But what happens when their parents divorce? Wha...

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When marriages dissolve, courts can divide the spouses’ jointly owned real estate as part of the divorce proceedings. In contrast, when unmarried couples owning real estate together split up, the division of their co-owned property is not so simple. This article explores the procedural avenues avail...

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The mental and physical health of parents are relevant factors in Georgia child custody disputes.(1) For that reason, litigating parents frequently seek to obtain discovery of each other’s medical and/or psychiatric records. Procedural vehicles, such as subpoenas and requests for production of docum...

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In Georgia, court judgments do not necessarily last forever. Statutory rules of dormancy in essence prevent the enforcement of a judgment to which no attempt at collection has occurred in the prior seven years. But do those dormancy rules apply to awards for equitable division, alimony, child suppor...

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Not all domestic matters in Georgia can be tried by a jury. Most significantly, for instance, only a judge can try child custody issues.(1) In divorce actions, however, a jury determines whether specific items constitute marital property, or nonmarital property of a spouse.(2) The jury also equitabl...

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