Keon Family Law

The general rule in Georgia holds that parties to legal proceedings must pay their own attorney’s fees and litigation expenses, absent a contract or statute providing otherwise.(1) In various domestic actions, however, Georgia statutes explicitly authorize awards of legal fees and expenses. This art...

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The term “residency” is an oft-used word in the law and figures prominently in the areas of jurisdiction and venue, including in domestic cases. For example, to file for divorce in Georgia, the plaintiff must have been a “bona fide resident” of Georgia for six months before the filing of the petitio...

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With certain exceptions, Georgia law precludes a child support obligor from seeking downward modification within two years from the date of the final order on that parent’s previous petition to modify child support.(1) The purpose of that limitation is to protect parents from excessive litigation ov...

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All too often a former spouse will claim that his or her ex has violated the terms of their divorce decree. Whether the charge involves failure to pay alimony or child support, denial of custody or visitation rights, acts of parental alienation or harassment, or failure to comply with provisions for...

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Parents, spouses, or former spouses who expect to lose the cases they filed concerning divorce, alimony, child custody, or child support may love the ability to terminate the actions before suffering defeat and to refile the same claims after regrouping. But can they?

A Georgia statute permits pla...

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