Keon Family Law

In Georgia child custody proceedings, statutory law expressly permits parents to reach agreements “respecting any and all issues concerning custody of the child.”(1) A judge presented with such an agreement must ratify it “unless the judge makes specific written factual findings as a part of the fin...

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Under certain circumstances, Georgia law has permitted courts or juries to utilize a party’s earning capacity rather than gross income to determine the amounts of child support, alimony, and attorney’s fees to award in divorce actions and other domestic cases.(1) One factor considered when analyzing...

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In a typical marriage, spouses talk to each other. They share intimate details of their lives, reveal their strengths and weaknesss, and discuss their deeds – both good and bad. When a marriage fails, the couple’s previously-disclosed flaws and unsavory acts often prove relevant to determinations in...

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This concluding article of a two-part series explores the types of misconduct deemed egregious enough to terminate a mother or father’s parental rights, as well as misbehaviors found insufficient to justify termination of parental rights in specific cases. Typically, conduct imperiling parental ri...

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A parent in Georgia who has abandoned, neglected, abused, or failed to support a child can lose his or her parental rights by voluntarily surrendering them, or upon entry of a court order terminating those parental rights in certain juvenile court proceedings and in superior court actions involving...

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