Keon Family Law

Before entering a final judgment granting or denying alimony, a Georgia trial court must hear evidence of the factual cause of the parties’ separation, and must consider evidence of the conduct of each party toward the other.(1) If it is established by a preponderance of the evidence that adultery o...

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The general rule in Georgia holds that parties to legal proceedings must pay their own attorney’s fees and litigation expenses, absent a contract or statute providing otherwise.(1) In various domestic actions, however, Georgia statutes explicitly authorize awards of legal fees and expenses. This art...

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The filing of a divorce action and the separation of the parties do not necessarily prevent consideration of end spousal misconduct which led to the dissolution of the marriage. Adultery, cruel treatment, and harassment that preceded a divorce action can continue throughout the proceedings. The issu...

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Adultery not only ruins marriages, but it also has legal significance in divorce.

Adultery by either spouse during the marriage creates fault grounds for a total divorce under Georgia law.(1) Adultery in that context is defined as sexual intercourse with a person of either sex other than one’s sp...

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Provisions of a final judgment and decree of divorce typically settle all issues regarding division of the spouses’ assets, child custody, child support, and alimony. Whether and to what extent either spouse can modify those provisions after entry of a final judgment are the most common questions ra...

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