Keon Family Law

A custodial spouse’s relocation at best creates some inconvenience for the non-custodial spouse in exercising visitation rights. At worst, such relocation can substantially interfere with the parenting time to which the non-custodial parent otherwise would enjoy. But does an intended or already-comp...

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With certain exceptions, Georgia law precludes a child support obligor from seeking downward modification within two years from the date of the final order on that parent’s previous petition to modify child support.(1) The purpose of that limitation is to protect parents from excessive litigation ov...

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The general rule in Georgia holds that parties to legal proceedings must pay their own attorney’s fees and litigation expenses, absent a contract or statute providing otherwise.(1) In various domestic actions, however, Georgia statutes explicitly authorize awards of legal fees and expenses. This art...

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Provisions of a final judgment and decree of divorce typically settle all issues regarding division of the spouses’ assets, child custody, child support, and alimony. Whether and to what extent either spouse can modify those provisions after entry of a final judgment are the most common questions ra...

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Everyone contemplating divorce should have a consultation with a practicing family law attorney. Consultations typically last one to two hours and are confidential. One attorney cannot give legal advice to both parties without violating Georgia State Bar Rules. Hiring an attorney for representatio...

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