Keon Family Law

Not all domestic matters in Georgia can be tried by a jury. Most significantly, for instance, only a judge can try child custody issues.(1) In divorce actions, however, a jury determines whether specific items constitute marital property, or nonmarital property of a spouse.(2) The jury also equitabl...

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Most domestic cases in Georgia are tried without juries, and all custody matters are determined by judges alone. As might be expected, a party suffering adverse rulings at times feels victim of unfair bias by the trial judge. In such instance, does the party have any recourse? Can the party force th...

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A prior article addressed the principles governing whether the appreciation in value of business interests, stocks, mutual funds, bonds, and similar investment holdings, brought into a marriage by a spouse constitute marital property subject to equitable division on divorce, or a spouse’s separate...

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A custodial spouse’s relocation at best creates some inconvenience for the non-custodial spouse in exercising visitation rights. At worst, such relocation can substantially interfere with the parenting time to which the non-custodial parent otherwise would enjoy. But does an intended or already-comp...

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Before entering a final judgment granting or denying alimony, a Georgia trial court must hear evidence of the factual cause of the parties’ separation, and must consider evidence of the conduct of each party toward the other.(1) If it is established by a preponderance of the evidence that adultery o...

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